Flipping and the Rise of Zombie Formalism - Artspace
One thing I’m hearing these days, loud and clear, is the hum of an art style that I like to call Zombie Formalism. “Formalism” because this art involves a straightforward, reductive, essentialist method of making a painting (yes, I admit it, I’m hung up on painting), and “Zombie” because it brings back to life the discarded aesthetics of Clement Greenberg, the man who championed Jackson Pollock, Morris Louis, and Frank Stella’s “black paintings,” among other things.
Flipping and the Rise of Zombie Formalism - Artspace

One thing I’m hearing these days, loud and clear, is the hum of an art style that I like to call Zombie Formalism. “Formalism” because this art involves a straightforward, reductive, essentialist method of making a painting (yes, I admit it, I’m hung up on painting), and “Zombie” because it brings back to life the discarded aesthetics of Clement Greenberg, the man who championed Jackson Pollock, Morris Louis, and Frank Stella’s “black paintings,” among other things.


manpodcast:

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features J. Paul Getty Museum curator Scott Allan.  Allan curated "The Scandalous Art of James Ensor," which is on view through September 7.
The show focuses on Ensor’s wild, groundbreaking work of the 1880s and 1890s, and places the artist’s two greatest works in the context of Ensor’s larger project. The Getty’s own Christ’s Entry into Brussels in 1889 is famous and well-known, but the exhibition also includes Ensor’s 1887 The Temptation of St. Anthony, a mammoth drawing never before exhibited in the United States. It’s in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago, to which this exhibition will travel after it’s in LA. 
The image here is Ensor’s The Cathedral. One of Ensor’s best etchings, this piece includes one of Ensor’s densest crowds. MAN Podcast host Tyler Green and Allan discussed Ensor’s crowds on this week’s program. 
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

manpodcast:

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features J. Paul Getty Museum curator Scott Allan.  Allan curated "The Scandalous Art of James Ensor," which is on view through September 7.

The show focuses on Ensor’s wild, groundbreaking work of the 1880s and 1890s, and places the artist’s two greatest works in the context of Ensor’s larger project. The Getty’s own Christ’s Entry into Brussels in 1889 is famous and well-known, but the exhibition also includes Ensor’s 1887 The Temptation of St. Anthony, a mammoth drawing never before exhibited in the United States. It’s in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago, to which this exhibition will travel after it’s in LA. 

The image here is Ensor’s The Cathedral. One of Ensor’s best etchings, this piece includes one of Ensor’s densest crowds. MAN Podcast host Tyler Green and Allan discussed Ensor’s crowds on this week’s program. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


philamuseum:

Our Man Crush Monday is just a man who’s comfortable in his own skin and enjoys the simple things in life. Édouard Manet took inspiration from the Dutch masters and painted this portrait of a gentleman who has settled down to enjoy his bock, a spring beer. “Le Bon Bock,” 1873, by Édouard Manet

philamuseum:

Our Man Crush Monday is just a man who’s comfortable in his own skin and enjoys the simple things in life. Édouard Manet took inspiration from the Dutch masters and painted this portrait of a gentleman who has settled down to enjoy his bock, a spring beer.

Le Bon Bock,” 1873, by Édouard Manet


sfmoma:

Bejeweled and begrimed. Seductive yet repulsive. Marilyn Minter’s Strut, a dirty heel wearing a Dior stiletto, is enamel painted on metal.
Allison Harding, assistant curator of contemporary art at the Asian Art Museum, writes:

Despite the excesses of Minter’s work, I cannot stop staring at one small speck of grime on the larger-than-life heel. It is just under the fleshy, swollen fold of the skin right about where the ankle meets the heel. It looks wet, three-dimensional, and for reasons I cannot quite express, outright disgusting. I feel this filthy speck and it sends shivers down my spine, undoing the façade of glamorous. It is just too close to real life. Of course, this is exactly the point. Minter’s subject reminds us that, in the end even the most glamorous figure will be covered in dirt.


How do you respond to Strut? It is beautiful? Revolting? Glamorous? Gorgeous? Or something else?


Gorgeous brings together the collections of the Asian Art Museum and SFMOMA. The exhibition, on view at the Asian Art Museum, explores the extremes and ambiguities of beauty, inviting viewers to draw their own conclusions.

sfmoma:

Bejeweled and begrimed. Seductive yet repulsive. Marilyn Minter’s Strut, a dirty heel wearing a Dior stiletto, is enamel painted on metal.

Allison Harding, assistant curator of contemporary art at the Asian Art Museum, writes:

Despite the excesses of Minter’s work, I cannot stop staring at one small speck of grime on the larger-than-life heel. It is just under the fleshy, swollen fold of the skin right about where the ankle meets the heel. It looks wet, three-dimensional, and for reasons I cannot quite express, outright disgusting. I feel this filthy speck and it sends shivers down my spine, undoing the façade of glamorous. It is just too close to real life. Of course, this is exactly the point. Minter’s subject reminds us that, in the end even the most glamorous figure will be covered in dirt.

How do you respond to Strut? It is beautiful? Revolting? Glamorous? Gorgeous? Or something else?

Gorgeous brings together the collections of the Asian Art Museum and SFMOMA. The exhibition, on view at the Asian Art Museum, explores the extremes and ambiguities of beauty, inviting viewers to draw their own conclusions.