Before I finished it Arensberg put something inside the ball of twine, and never told me what it was, and I didn’t want to know. It was a sort of secret between us, and it makes noise, so we called this a Ready-made with a hidden noise. Listen to it. I don’t know; I will never know whether it is a diamond or a coin.

Marcel Duchamp, With Hidden Noise (1916)

In 1957, in his Seminar Les formations de l’inconscient, Lacan introduces the concept of objet petit a as the (Kleinian) imaginary part-object, an element which is imagined as separable from the rest of the body. In the Seminar Le transfert (1960–1961) he articulates objet a with the term agalma (Greek, an ornament). Just as the agalma is a precious object hidden in a worthless box, so objet petit a is the object of desire which we seek in the Other. The ‘box’ can take many forms, all of which are unimportant, the importance lies in what is ‘inside’ the box, the cause of desire. (From wiki on object a)
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Marcel Duchamp, With Hidden Noise (1916)

In 1957, in his Seminar Les formations de l’inconscient, Lacan introduces the concept of objet petit a as the (Kleinian) imaginary part-object, an element which is imagined as separable from the rest of the body. In the Seminar Le transfert (1960–1961) he articulates objet a with the term agalma (Greek, an ornament). Just as the agalma is a precious object hidden in a worthless box, so objet petit a is the object of desire which we seek in the Other. The ‘box’ can take many forms, all of which are unimportant, the importance lies in what is ‘inside’ the box, the cause of desire. (From wiki on object a)

(via sinthematica)


philamuseum:

Happy birthday to Marcel Duchamp! A pioneer of conceptual art and Dadaism, the artist famously said, “I have forced myself to contradict myself in order to avoid conforming to my own taste.” Did you know the Museum houses the largest collection of Duchamp’s works in the world?

Image 1: "Nude Descending a Staircase (No. 1),"1911, Marcel Duchamp

Image 2: "The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass)," 1915-23, Marcel Duchamp

Image 3: “Fountain,” 1950 (replica of 1917 original), Marcel Duchamp

Image 4: "Étant donnés," 1946–66, by Marcel Duchamp

Image 5: "Chocolate Grinder (No. 1)," 1913,Marcel Duchamp

Image 6: "Why Not Sneeze, Rose Sélavy?," 1921, Marcel Duchamp

Image 7: "Marcel Duchamp (Full Face)." 1933, Carl Van Vechten

Image 8: "Marcel Duchamp (Three-Quarter View)," 1933,Carl Van Vechten

All images © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris/Estate of Marcel Duchamp


artistandstudio:

Marcel Duchamp playing chess against IBM’s super computer known as Deep Blue.   via
“By 1923, Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) had established himself as a singular force in the avant-garde art communities on both sides of the Atlantic. Then, suddenly, after two decades of unparalleled innovation and considerable controversy, he was reported to have quit making art in order to focus on his new passion: chess. Of course, Duchamp never quit being an artist; he was, however, thoroughly engaged in a radical redefinition of art that favored-much like chess-a more conceptual approach.
Following a brief excursion to Buenos Aires during 1918 and 1919, where he became a self-described “chess maniac,” his interest in the game grew far beyond an idle pastime. He soon made it his objective to win the French Chess Championship. Between 1923 and 1933, chess dominated Duchamp’s life as he competed in tournaments across Europe. Following several respectable performances, including a first-place finish at the Chess Championship of Haute Normandie in 1924, he was awarded the title of Chess Master by the French Chess Federation.”   SLUMA

artistandstudio:

Marcel Duchamp playing chess against IBM’s super computer known as Deep Blue.   via

“By 1923, Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) had established himself as a singular force in the avant-garde art communities on both sides of the Atlantic. Then, suddenly, after two decades of unparalleled innovation and considerable controversy, he was reported to have quit making art in order to focus on his new passion: chess. Of course, Duchamp never quit being an artist; he was, however, thoroughly engaged in a radical redefinition of art that favored-much like chess-a more conceptual approach.

Following a brief excursion to Buenos Aires during 1918 and 1919, where he became a self-described “chess maniac,” his interest in the game grew far beyond an idle pastime. He soon made it his objective to win the French Chess Championship. Between 1923 and 1933, chess dominated Duchamp’s life as he competed in tournaments across Europe. Following several respectable performances, including a first-place finish at the Chess Championship of Haute Normandie in 1924, he was awarded the title of Chess Master by the French Chess Federation.”   SLUMA


3rdofmay:

The art: Marcel Duchamp, Portrait of Chess Players, 1911.
The news: “At a Brooklyn School, The Cool Crowd Pushes the King Around,” by Anne Barnard and Dylan Loeb McClain for the New York Times.
The source: Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Duchamp loved chess and even created his own personal pocket chess set. Duchamp wasn’t the only artist of his generation fascinated by the game: Max Ernst designed chess pieces too, complete with a twist on the historical norm.

3rdofmay:

The art: Marcel Duchamp, Portrait of Chess Players, 1911.

The news: “At a Brooklyn School, The Cool Crowd Pushes the King Around,” by Anne Barnard and Dylan Loeb McClain for the New York Times.

The source: Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Duchamp loved chess and even created his own personal pocket chess set. Duchamp wasn’t the only artist of his generation fascinated by the game: Max Ernst designed chess pieces too, complete with a twist on the historical norm.