ancientart:

Terracotta askos (flask) in the form of a rooster. Etruscan, 4th century B.C.

The Etruscans produced numerous askoi in the shape of ducks, but askoi in the shape of other birds are quite rare. Only one other rooster-shaped example is known, almost identical to this one. The askos in the form of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula), a Eurasian bird similar to a small crow, is the only one known.
It is adorned with a protective bulla (amulet) necklace of the type usually worn by Etruscan children and must represent someone’s favorite pet.

Courtesy & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections. Accession Number: 29.131.5.

ancientart:

Terracotta askos (flask) in the form of a rooster. Etruscan, 4th century B.C.

The Etruscans produced numerous askoi in the shape of ducks, but askoi in the shape of other birds are quite rare. Only one other rooster-shaped example is known, almost identical to this one. The askos in the form of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula), a Eurasian bird similar to a small crow, is the only one known.

It is adorned with a protective bulla (amulet) necklace of the type usually worn by Etruscan children and must represent someone’s favorite pet.

Courtesy & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections. Accession Number: 29.131.5.


medievalpoc:

Various Designers

British Porcelain Dessert Figurines of Black Servants

England (1760s-70s)

Soft-paste porcelain painted with enamels and slightly gilded.

The earliest porcelain figures were made for the dessert course of grand dinners and replaced the sugar paste and wax figures made since medieval times for royal feasts. Originally intended as expressions of dynastic power and to celebrate political allegiances, allegorical themes had been introduced into these table settings by the 16th century. By the 18th century many were entirely decorative. Meissen in Germany was the first factory to make porcelain figures for the dessert. It set the sculptural conventions followed by porcelain factories elsewhere.

During the 18th century dessert was the course on which the greatest effort and expense were lavished. The food served and the fine porcelain which accompanied it reflected the wealth and good taste of the host. The increasing availability of porcelain through factories like Meissen, and sugar from the West Indies meant a greater number of people could enjoy decorative desserts.

Black Africans offered exotic associations and were a marker of luxury within the English home. In the 18th century about 10,000 Africans are estimated to have been living in England. Many worked as, often unpaid, domestic staff.

-Victoria and Albert Museum

These figurines show how depictions of Black British in the 1700s began to shift away from individualism in many ways, and become more objectified than in previous works from earlier centuries. These figures are symbols of wealth and ownership, rather than being portraits of individuals. They also are a harbinger of mass-produced factory items; although these were not cheap, many of the same were made.

The V&A description of these people as “Black Africans” is othering; it’s safe to say that these figured represent British people of African descent, who had been living in England in great numbers since the Middle Ages.

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ancientart:

Terracotta column-krater (bowl for mixing wine and water) Attributed to the Group of Boston. Greek, Late Classical, ca. 360–350 B.C.

Obverse, artist painting a statue of Herakles Reverse, Athena with deities
Representations of artists at work are exceedingly rare. This vase illustrates a craft for which virtually no evidence survives, that of applying pigment to stone sculpture using the technique of encaustic. The column and phiale (libation bowl) at the far left indicate an interior space, probably a sanctuary. In the foreground stands a statue of Herakles with his club, bow, and lion-skin. The painter, characterized by his cap and his garment worn to leave his upper body bare, applies a mixture of pigment and wax with a spatula to Herakles’ lion-skin. To the left, an African boy tends the brazier on which rods are heating that will spread the tinted wax. Above, Zeus, ruler of the gods, and Nike, personification of victory, preside as Herakles himself ambles in from the right to survey his image.
The reverse, in an outdoor setting, shows Herakles’ staunch protectress, Athena, seated in conversation with one of the Dioskouroi. To the left, Hermes, the messenger god, turns away from Pan, his son, while Eros plays with a bird below. Surely complementary, the pictures may refer to the apotheosis of Herakles. Rather than driving to Mount Olympos in a chariot, Herakles sees himself monumentalized in stone, while Athena, her task accomplished, takes her ease between divine travelers. 

Courtesy & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections.

ancientart:

Terracotta column-krater (bowl for mixing wine and water) Attributed to the Group of Boston. Greek, Late Classical, ca. 360–350 B.C.

Obverse, artist painting a statue of Herakles Reverse, Athena with deities

Representations of artists at work are exceedingly rare. This vase illustrates a craft for which virtually no evidence survives, that of applying pigment to stone sculpture using the technique of encaustic. The column and phiale (libation bowl) at the far left indicate an interior space, probably a sanctuary. In the foreground stands a statue of Herakles with his club, bow, and lion-skin. The painter, characterized by his cap and his garment worn to leave his upper body bare, applies a mixture of pigment and wax with a spatula to Herakles’ lion-skin. To the left, an African boy tends the brazier on which rods are heating that will spread the tinted wax. Above, Zeus, ruler of the gods, and Nike, personification of victory, preside as Herakles himself ambles in from the right to survey his image.

The reverse, in an outdoor setting, shows Herakles’ staunch protectress, Athena, seated in conversation with one of the Dioskouroi. To the left, Hermes, the messenger god, turns away from Pan, his son, while Eros plays with a bird below. Surely complementary, the pictures may refer to the apotheosis of Herakles. Rather than driving to Mount Olympos in a chariot, Herakles sees himself monumentalized in stone, while Athena, her task accomplished, takes her ease between divine travelers. 

Courtesy & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections.


blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: I recently spent another day at the great Barnes Foundation, now in downtown Philadelphia. The Cézannes, as always, blew me away, and I rolled my eyes at the piles of Renoir nudes, as we’ve learned to do. But aside from those standard pleasures and pains, I was struck by all the unusual experiences the collection provides when you try to go beyond its bromides. This Renoir vase, for instance, sits in front of a Renoir nude – and the canvas (an early one, better than many) profits by the unfleshy companionship. But here’s something I didn’t twig to until I ordered the image: The vase, from the early 1920s, is by a twentysomething Jean Renoir. Turns out that, on his long crawl out from under his father’s shadow, Jean passed by clay on his way to cinema.
For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: I recently spent another day at the great Barnes Foundation, now in downtown Philadelphia. The Cézannes, as always, blew me away, and I rolled my eyes at the piles of Renoir nudes, as we’ve learned to do. But aside from those standard pleasures and pains, I was struck by all the unusual experiences the collection provides when you try to go beyond its bromides. This Renoir vase, for instance, sits in front of a Renoir nude – and the canvas (an early one, better than many) profits by the unfleshy companionship. But here’s something I didn’t twig to until I ordered the image: The vase, from the early 1920s, is by a twentysomething Jean Renoir. Turns out that, on his long crawl out from under his father’s shadow, Jean passed by clay on his way to cinema.

For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive