mediumaevum:

Bidriware is a handicraft that originated in the 14th century India, and was very popular for centuries. 

(An alloy of copper and zinc is casted into a desired shape, and then coated with a strong solution of copper sulphate, to get a black glaze. An artisan then uses a metal stylus to etch intricate designs by removing the coating.)

This technique has made a great comeback in the most unlikely fashion. Artisans are now making USB drive covers, office stationery, lampshades and even floor tiles. Read on

(Top image: A 17th century, Bidriware Hookah base at Louvre)


kintsugi-repair:

Guess what this is. 

This is is a tool called taiki, which means tai fish tooth. Don’t say it’s creepy. It’s a traditional tool to polish gold. Tai fish has strong teeth, so it is one of the best tool to make sprinkled gold shinny. 

My friend who also learns kintsugi is a chef, and he gave a dozen of teeth. it’s interesting to handmake kintsugi tools. 

鯛牙をつくってみた!

これは文字通り鯛の牙を筆の柄にくっつけただけの道具で、昔から金を磨くのに使われているらしい。

金継ぎ友の友人が料理人で、鯛の牙をごっそりくれたのだ。ありがたや!

鯛牙はお店でも買えるけど、自分で作るとさらに愛着がわくねー。


in-the-horniman:

We love this pot from Peru. It is made of burnished terracotta and depicts a copulating couple between the shoulder and the neck of the object.

I’ve always wondered if the idea of torture, of violently bloating figure(s)’ stomachs with liquid, was actually involved in the imagery and use of this type of pot.

in-the-horniman:

We love this pot from Peru. It is made of burnished terracotta and depicts a copulating couple between the shoulder and the neck of the object.

I’ve always wondered if the idea of torture, of violently bloating figure(s)’ stomachs with liquid, was actually involved in the imagery and use of this type of pot.


ancientart:

Terracotta askos (flask) in the form of a rooster. Etruscan, 4th century B.C.

The Etruscans produced numerous askoi in the shape of ducks, but askoi in the shape of other birds are quite rare. Only one other rooster-shaped example is known, almost identical to this one. The askos in the form of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula), a Eurasian bird similar to a small crow, is the only one known.
It is adorned with a protective bulla (amulet) necklace of the type usually worn by Etruscan children and must represent someone’s favorite pet.

Courtesy & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections. Accession Number: 29.131.5.

ancientart:

Terracotta askos (flask) in the form of a rooster. Etruscan, 4th century B.C.

The Etruscans produced numerous askoi in the shape of ducks, but askoi in the shape of other birds are quite rare. Only one other rooster-shaped example is known, almost identical to this one. The askos in the form of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula), a Eurasian bird similar to a small crow, is the only one known.

It is adorned with a protective bulla (amulet) necklace of the type usually worn by Etruscan children and must represent someone’s favorite pet.

Courtesy & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections. Accession Number: 29.131.5.