The trial of the man accused of shooting and killing 12 people and injuring dozens more in a packed Colorado movie theater can be televised on a closed-circuit feed, a state judge ruled Tuesday.

But strict regulations accompany the ruling.District Judge Carlos Samour said James E. Holmes’ trial can be broadcast but only with a single, remote-control-operated camera already in use in the courtroom, according to court documents.

The camera will not be allowed to zoom in or out without the judge’s permission and will not show the jury.

In addition, no newspaper photographers will be allowed to take photos during the trial, Samour ruled. Photos will have to be taken directly from the closed-circuit feed.


We tend to perceive our identities as stable and largely separate from outside forces. But over decades of research and therapeutic practice, I have become convinced that economic change is having a profound effect not only on our values but also on our personalities. Thirty years of neoliberalism, free-market forces and privatisation have taken their toll, as relentless pressure to achieve has become normative. If you’re reading this sceptically, I put this simple statement to you: meritocratic neoliberalism favours certain personality traits and penalises others.

There are certain ideal characteristics needed to make a career today. The first is articulateness, the aim being to win over as many people as possible. Contact can be superficial, but since this applies to most human interaction nowadays, this won’t really be noticed.

It’s important to be able to talk up your own capacities as much as you can – you know a lot of people, you’ve got plenty of experience under your belt and you recently completed a major project. Later, people will find out that this was mostly hot air, but the fact that they were initially fooled is down to another personality trait: you can lie convincingly and feel little guilt. That’s why you never take responsibility for your own behaviour.

On top of all this, you are flexible and impulsive, always on the lookout for new stimuli and challenges. In practice, this leads to risky behaviour, but never mind, it won’t be you who has to pick up the pieces. The source of inspiration for this list? The psychopathy checklist by Robert Hare, the best-known specialist on psychopathy today.

This description is, of course, a caricature taken to extremes. Nevertheless, the financial crisis illustrated at a macro-social level (for example, in the conflicts between eurozone countries) what a neoliberal meritocracy does to people. Solidarity becomes an expensive luxury and makes way for temporary alliances, the main preoccupation always being to extract more profit from the situation than your competition. Social ties with colleagues weaken, as does emotional commitment to the enterprise or organisation.


The unrest, the worst in Hong Kong since China resumed its rule over the former British colony in 1997, sent white clouds of gas wafting among some of the world’s most valuable office towers and shopping malls before riot police suddenly withdrew around lunchtime on Monday, after three nights of confrontation.

"Since calm has been largely restored to the streets where citizens gathered, riot police have withdrawn," the Hong Kong government said in a statement. It called on protesters to stay calm and disperse peacefully "as soon as possible".

As riot police withdrew, weary protesters slept beside roads or sheltered from the sun beneath umbrellas, which have become a symbol of what some are calling the “Umbrella Revolution”. In addition to protection from the elements, umbrellas have been used as flimsy shields against pepper spray.

Organizers have said that as many as 80,000 people have thronged the streets after the protests flared on Friday night. No independent estimate of numbers was available.

The protests, led mostly by young tech-savvy students who have grown up with freedoms not enjoyed in mainland China, represent one of the biggest threats confronted by Beijing’s Communist Party leadership since its bloody 1989 crackdown on pro-democracy student protests in and around Tiananmen Square.

Cracking down too hard could shake confidence in market-driven Hong Kong, while not reacting firmly enough could embolden dissidents on the mainland.


Tensions rose further Saturday night, when officials said a Ferguson police officer on routine patrol was shot in the arm during a foot chase behind the community center. The unidentified officer was treated and released; the shooter escaped.

A few hours later, not far outside Ferguson’s city limits, an off-duty St. Louis police officer was ambushed on the freeway by one or more gunmen, who shot his car multiple times and escaped, officials said. The officer was injured by broken glass. He was not in uniform and was in his own vehicle; it was unclear whether he was targeted or the victim of a random assault.

Ferguson fears the worst is yet to come, especially if the grand jury does not indict Officer Darren Wilson. A decision is expected in November.


a closely watched beach-access case, a San Mateo County judge ruled tentatively Wednesday that a Silicon Valley venture capitalist violated the California Coastal Act by denying public access across his property to a popular spot near Half Moon Bay.

Superior Court Judge Barbara Mallach ruled that by padlocking a gate, hiring security guards and altering signs without state permission, Vinod Khosla had wrongly denied public access to Martin’s Beach, granting a legal victory to the nonprofit Surfrider Foundation, which brought suit.

[…]

The case has raised questions of whether a private property owner can be compelled to provide public beach access just because his predecessor did, and whether the California Coastal Commission is within constitutional bounds when it negotiates for such access in exchange for coastal development permits.

The order by Mallach means that Khosla must immediately “cease preventing public access to the coast,” said Angela Howe, legal director for the Surfrider Foundation.

The case resonated with some people because it reflected fears that tech billionaires were buying up coastal properties with the intention of keeping others out.


iho, an office worker from Tokyo, is backed against a wall. Two men in suits approach her. “Do I frighten you?” one asks. Quite suddenly, one of them extends his arm. It hits the wall with a thud. Miho is trapped as he leans toward her…

This aggressive move, popular with fictional Japanese tough guys, is called kabedon—”wall-thump.” If a stranger were to corner her like this on the street outside the Makuhari Messe convention center, Miho might have been afraid for her life. Here inside the Tokyo Game Show, it’s all part of the show. In fact, she waited in line to experience being so aggressively hit on.

“It’s very exciting,” she said afterward. Her coworker Ayaka agreed: “They say such sweet things.”

The two women told me they’ve never before attended Tokyo Game Show, but they came this year specifically because they play dating sim videogames made by Voltage, which hosted this interactive fantasy. Voltage was but one of the game publishers showing their games in the Romance Game Corner, a section dedicated to dating simulation games aimed at women.

Dating sims are among the few game genres in Japan designed for, and actively marketed to, women. Last year’s inaugural Romance Game Corner was a small booth on the periphery of Japan’s big gaming convention. This year, it was front and center in the main hall. The exhibitors capitalized on this by packing their booths with eye-grabbing attractions featuring attractive male models.


Repressing desire, not only for others but in oneself, being the cop for others and for oneself – that is what arouses, and it is not ideology, it is economy. Capitalism garners and possesses the force of the aim and the interest (power), but it feels a disinterested love for the absurd and nonpossessed force of the machine. Oh, to be sure, it is not for himself or his children that the capitalist works, but for the immortality of the system. A violence without purpose, a joy, a pure joy in feeling oneself a wheel in the machine, traversed by flows, broken by schizzes. Placing oneself in apposition where one is thus traversed, broken, fucked by the socius, looking for the right place where, according to the aims and the interests assigned to us, one feels something moving that has neither an interest nor a purpose. A sort of art for art’s sake in the libido, a taste for a job well done, each one in his own place, the banker, the cop, the soldier, the technocrat, the bureaucrat, and why not the worker, the trade-unionist. Desire is agape.

Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia, pg. 346-47 (via dw-miller)

This —>

(via linnewhat)

A sprawling new plant here in a former soybean field makes the mechanical guts of America’s atomic warheads. Bigger than the Pentagon, full of futuristic gear and thousands of workers, the plant, dedicated last month, modernizes the aging weapons that the United States can fire from missiles, bombers and submarines.

It is part of a nationwide wave of atomic revitalization that includes plans for a new generation of weapon carriers. A recent federal study put the collective price tag, over the next three decades, at up to a trillion dollars.

This expansion comes under a president who campaigned for “a nuclear-free world” and made disarmament a main goal of American defense policy. The original idea was that modest rebuilding of the nation’s crumbling nuclear complex would speed arms refurbishment, raising confidence in the arsenal’s reliability and paving the way for new treaties that would significantly cut the number of warheads.

Instead, because of political deals and geopolitical crises, the Obama administration is engaging in extensive atomic rebuilding while getting only modest arms reductions in return.

Supporters of arms control, as well as some of President Obama’s closest advisers, say their hopes for the president’s vision have turned to baffled disappointment as the modernization of nuclear capabilities has become an end unto itself.


ucresearch:

Neuroscience could alter feeling disappointed
Finding an antidote for feeling let-down may now be possible. Researchers at UC San Diego have identified a control mechanism for an area of the brain that processes sensory and emotive information that humans experience as feeling depressed.
“The idea that some people see the world as a glass half empty has a chemical basis in the brain,” said senior author Roberto Malinow. “What we have found is a process that may dampen the brain’s sensitivity to negative life events.”
Because people struggling with depression are believed to register negative experiences more strongly than others, the study’s findings have implications for understanding not just why some people have a brain chemistry that predisposes them to depression but also how to treat it.
Read more about the finding here →

The idea that (most) people see a world at all has a chemical basis in the brain too.

ucresearch:

Neuroscience could alter feeling disappointed

Finding an antidote for feeling let-down may now be possible. Researchers at UC San Diego have identified a control mechanism for an area of the brain that processes sensory and emotive information that humans experience as feeling depressed.

“The idea that some people see the world as a glass half empty has a chemical basis in the brain,” said senior author Roberto Malinow. “What we have found is a process that may dampen the brain’s sensitivity to negative life events.”

Because people struggling with depression are believed to register negative experiences more strongly than others, the study’s findings have implications for understanding not just why some people have a brain chemistry that predisposes them to depression but also how to treat it.

Read more about the finding here →

The idea that (most) people see a world at all has a chemical basis in the brain too.


The women I talked to found that avoiding a conversation about money actually led to more of it. When she first signed up on the site, Rebecca, a sophomore at NYU, asked potential sugar daddies about money right away—sometimes even before the first date. After a few months of making far less than her friends on the site, she decided to stop asking. She started waiting for the daddy to bring up the money issue and was immediately more successful.

Like Rebecca, Amanda never directly asks for money. Instead, she waits until the sugar daddy is comfortable enough to give her a credit card in his name.

“I get to a point in these relationships when the guy starts to naturally want to pay for things for me. They prefer giving me a credit card because it feels more informal. There is no direct exchange of money,” Amanda said.

In this way, it’s easier for the men—and, to a certain extent, the women—to pretend the transaction never actually happened.

“I found that some, if not most, of the guys don’t want to talk about money. I suspect that’s because it kills the fantasy,” said Wanitwat. “They’re trying to pretend that these smart, beautiful women actually want to hang out with them.”

The illusion works the other way, as well. When a friend of mine started to think about joining Seeking Arrangement in our senior year, she told me the site was extremely popular among college students. She said tons of girls at Columbia and NYU had profiles to help pay tuition bills. This made the website seem safer, and less like prostitution. If half the women on the site really were college students—and the guys had a particular interest in meeting college students—maybe the work wasn’t just purely physical. Maybe it really was about the conversation and companionship, not just the sex.


A single dose of a popular class of psychiatric drug used to treat depression can alter the brain’s architecture within hours, even though most patients usually don’t report improvement for weeks, a new study suggests.

More than 1 in 10 adults in the U.S. use these drugs, which adjust the availability of a chemical transmitter in the brain, serotonin, by blocking the way it is reabsorbed. The so-called Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, or SSRIs, include Prozac, Lexapro, Celexa, Paxil and Zoloft.

The findings could be a first step toward figuring out whether a relatively simple brain scan might one day help psychiatrists distinguish between those who respond to such drugs and those who don’t, an area of mystery and controversy in depression treatment.


thinksquad:

It’s hard (if not impossible) to know just how prevalent this practice is, but some college students around the country are uploading their expensive college textbooks onto the Internet so other students can download them for free and avoid the hefty fees that are sometimes more than $200 a book.

Vocativ.com has a story titled “Why College Students are Stealing Their Textbooks,” which notes that some students are even downloading them for ethics classes.

The cost to students of college textbooks skyrocketed 82 percent between 2002 and 2012, according to a 2013 report by the U.S. General Accountability Office, the research arm of Congress. As a result, students have been looking for less expensive options, such as renting books — and, now, finding them on the Internet, uploaded by other students.

In August, an organization called the Book Industry Study Group, which represents publishers, retailers, manufacturers, distributors, wholesalers, librarians and others in the industry, released a survey of some 1,600 students and found, according to a release on the data, that “students continue to become more sophisticated in acquiring their course materials at the lowest cost as illicit and alternative acquisition behaviors, from scanned copies to illegal downloads to the use of pirated websites, continue to increase in frequency.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2014/09/17/more-students-are-illegally-downloading-college-textbooks-for-free/


memri:

di—es—-can-ic-ul-ar—es:

cyborgmemoirs:

densetsu-no-stahpenisu:

Looking back on it, fuck Spike Spiegel and Faye and even Ed.

I want to watch a series about all of the fascinating people who populate the planetary slums in Cowboy Bebop. You can tell through even a little glimpse that every person Spike passed by in this gifset and every person that he met throughout his journey had an infinitely interesting story than his little melodrama. Even the buildings have something to say.

this was the sentiment behind theafterv3rse creating Laser Life, our queer SF reading series… cause yeah, the white heroes are always just passing through the dystopian “slums” without a second thought…

Herzog’s analysis of Gummo comes to mind.

But yeah

Now that I think of it, yeah, Bebop should definitely have been about all the non-space-cowboys and their travails as interplanetary fuckups of an advanced capitalistic (galactic) regime.

I would have been more well educated as a young fuckup myself if I’d had those folks to look up to.