Tokyo Metropolitan Police announced that they have arrested a 42-year-old woman named Megumi Igarashi (aka Rokudenashi-ko) on suspicion of selling and distributing 3D printable design files of her own genitals. These files are said to have been sent via email to a 30-year-old man in Kagawa Prefecture, as well as many others, back in March.

According to reports, Igarashi has been selling her 3D design files to raise money to construct a boat that looks like a vagina. Since she began distribution of her art in October, she has raised ¥1 million (approximately $9,845).

Igarashi says that she does not consider the design files that she distributed to contain any obscene material. “I cannot understand why the police recognize the 3D data as obscene material,” Igarashi told police.


Flipping and the Rise of Zombie Formalism - Artspace
One thing I’m hearing these days, loud and clear, is the hum of an art style that I like to call Zombie Formalism. “Formalism” because this art involves a straightforward, reductive, essentialist method of making a painting (yes, I admit it, I’m hung up on painting), and “Zombie” because it brings back to life the discarded aesthetics of Clement Greenberg, the man who championed Jackson Pollock, Morris Louis, and Frank Stella’s “black paintings,” among other things.
Flipping and the Rise of Zombie Formalism - Artspace

One thing I’m hearing these days, loud and clear, is the hum of an art style that I like to call Zombie Formalism. “Formalism” because this art involves a straightforward, reductive, essentialist method of making a painting (yes, I admit it, I’m hung up on painting), and “Zombie” because it brings back to life the discarded aesthetics of Clement Greenberg, the man who championed Jackson Pollock, Morris Louis, and Frank Stella’s “black paintings,” among other things.


manpodcast:

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features J. Paul Getty Museum curator Scott Allan.  Allan curated "The Scandalous Art of James Ensor," which is on view through September 7.
The show focuses on Ensor’s wild, groundbreaking work of the 1880s and 1890s, and places the artist’s two greatest works in the context of Ensor’s larger project. The Getty’s own Christ’s Entry into Brussels in 1889 is famous and well-known, but the exhibition also includes Ensor’s 1887 The Temptation of St. Anthony, a mammoth drawing never before exhibited in the United States. It’s in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago, to which this exhibition will travel after it’s in LA. 
The image here is Ensor’s The Cathedral. One of Ensor’s best etchings, this piece includes one of Ensor’s densest crowds. MAN Podcast host Tyler Green and Allan discussed Ensor’s crowds on this week’s program. 
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

manpodcast:

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features J. Paul Getty Museum curator Scott Allan.  Allan curated "The Scandalous Art of James Ensor," which is on view through September 7.

The show focuses on Ensor’s wild, groundbreaking work of the 1880s and 1890s, and places the artist’s two greatest works in the context of Ensor’s larger project. The Getty’s own Christ’s Entry into Brussels in 1889 is famous and well-known, but the exhibition also includes Ensor’s 1887 The Temptation of St. Anthony, a mammoth drawing never before exhibited in the United States. It’s in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago, to which this exhibition will travel after it’s in LA. 

The image here is Ensor’s The Cathedral. One of Ensor’s best etchings, this piece includes one of Ensor’s densest crowds. MAN Podcast host Tyler Green and Allan discussed Ensor’s crowds on this week’s program. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at: