Funny Games - Michael Haneke - 1997 / 2007

If you’re a long time follower of Ozu Teapot you’ll know I like my interiors (and exteriors) so I found it interesting that the 2007 version of Funny Games was not only a shot-by-shot remake but that the set was built to the same proportions as the first film based on the original blueprints.


crematedadolescent:

majortomstincan:

leprincelointain:

Curt Stoeving (1863-1939), Friedrich Nietzsche - 1890

poor guy

No! NO!!!! Don’t make him real like this… No… The black&white keeps him abstract, and on a pedestal; that way he can be a god in my pantheon. I don’t want to see him as a human like this, it’s a disgrace. Burn this photograph. No… immanence is too much, I don’t know how you Christians do it. *vomits*

crematedadolescent:

majortomstincan:

leprincelointain:

Curt Stoeving (1863-1939), Friedrich Nietzsche - 1890

poor guy

No! NO!!!! Don’t make him real like this… No… The black&white keeps him abstract, and on a pedestal; that way he can be a god in my pantheon. I don’t want to see him as a human like this, it’s a disgrace. Burn this photograph. No… immanence is too much, I don’t know how you Christians do it. *vomits*


artmastered:

Aquamanile in the Form of Aristotle and Phyllis [unknown artist], late 14th/early 15th century, Netherlands, bronze, 32.5 x 17.9 x 39.3 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
An aquamanile is a type of vessel used for pouring water onto the hands before a meal - or before Mass in a religious context. I’m not totally sure where exactly the water flows from, but I’m guessing it has something to do with Aristotle’s head or neck. Phyllis, the daughter of a Thracian king in Greek mythology, is perched on the back of the philosopher. The story goes that Aristotle wanted to prove to young men that a seductive woman will even work her magic on the elderly. Here, he is shown in a humiliating pose that would have been highly amusing to guests observing the object at a dinner table.

artmastered:

Aquamanile in the Form of Aristotle and Phyllis [unknown artist], late 14th/early 15th century, Netherlands, bronze, 32.5 x 17.9 x 39.3 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

An aquamanile is a type of vessel used for pouring water onto the hands before a meal - or before Mass in a religious context. I’m not totally sure where exactly the water flows from, but I’m guessing it has something to do with Aristotle’s head or neck. Phyllis, the daughter of a Thracian king in Greek mythology, is perched on the back of the philosopher. The story goes that Aristotle wanted to prove to young men that a seductive woman will even work her magic on the elderly. Here, he is shown in a humiliating pose that would have been highly amusing to guests observing the object at a dinner table.


mediumaevum:

Bidriware is a handicraft that originated in the 14th century India, and was very popular for centuries. 

(An alloy of copper and zinc is casted into a desired shape, and then coated with a strong solution of copper sulphate, to get a black glaze. An artisan then uses a metal stylus to etch intricate designs by removing the coating.)

This technique has made a great comeback in the most unlikely fashion. Artisans are now making USB drive covers, office stationery, lampshades and even floor tiles. Read on

(Top image: A 17th century, Bidriware Hookah base at Louvre)