artistandstudio:

Marcel Duchamp playing chess against IBM’s super computer known as Deep Blue.   via
“By 1923, Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) had established himself as a singular force in the avant-garde art communities on both sides of the Atlantic. Then, suddenly, after two decades of unparalleled innovation and considerable controversy, he was reported to have quit making art in order to focus on his new passion: chess. Of course, Duchamp never quit being an artist; he was, however, thoroughly engaged in a radical redefinition of art that favored-much like chess-a more conceptual approach.
Following a brief excursion to Buenos Aires during 1918 and 1919, where he became a self-described “chess maniac,” his interest in the game grew far beyond an idle pastime. He soon made it his objective to win the French Chess Championship. Between 1923 and 1933, chess dominated Duchamp’s life as he competed in tournaments across Europe. Following several respectable performances, including a first-place finish at the Chess Championship of Haute Normandie in 1924, he was awarded the title of Chess Master by the French Chess Federation.”   SLUMA

artistandstudio:

Marcel Duchamp playing chess against IBM’s super computer known as Deep Blue.   via

“By 1923, Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) had established himself as a singular force in the avant-garde art communities on both sides of the Atlantic. Then, suddenly, after two decades of unparalleled innovation and considerable controversy, he was reported to have quit making art in order to focus on his new passion: chess. Of course, Duchamp never quit being an artist; he was, however, thoroughly engaged in a radical redefinition of art that favored-much like chess-a more conceptual approach.

Following a brief excursion to Buenos Aires during 1918 and 1919, where he became a self-described “chess maniac,” his interest in the game grew far beyond an idle pastime. He soon made it his objective to win the French Chess Championship. Between 1923 and 1933, chess dominated Duchamp’s life as he competed in tournaments across Europe. Following several respectable performances, including a first-place finish at the Chess Championship of Haute Normandie in 1924, he was awarded the title of Chess Master by the French Chess Federation.”   SLUMA


blog comments powered by Disqus