Leaders of Mali’s Military Coup Seem to Have Uncertain Grasp on Power | NYTimes.com
“The situation is calmer today, but people are still uneasy,” said Moctar Mariko, president of the Malian Human Rights Association. “There is a gasoline crisis. Men in uniform were helping themselves freely, and not paying.”

Like others, he condemned the coup, but also Mr. Touré’s government for mishandling the rebel invasion in the north. There is wide agreement among politicians, analysts and civil-society activists that Mr. Touré had left his relatively small army unprepared and underequipped to deal with a rebel force that had armed itself heavily with weapons from the armories of the fallen Libyan leader Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi.

“The government had not sufficiently prepared the army to confront the rebellion,” Mr. Dramé said in an interview. “Most of the defeats in the desert were because the troops had no motivation to fight. The Malian army was humiliated.”

Leaders of Mali’s Military Coup Seem to Have Uncertain Grasp on Power | NYTimes.com

“The situation is calmer today, but people are still uneasy,” said Moctar Mariko, president of the Malian Human Rights Association. “There is a gasoline crisis. Men in uniform were helping themselves freely, and not paying.”

Like others, he condemned the coup, but also Mr. Touré’s government for mishandling the rebel invasion in the north. There is wide agreement among politicians, analysts and civil-society activists that Mr. Touré had left his relatively small army unprepared and underequipped to deal with a rebel force that had armed itself heavily with weapons from the armories of the fallen Libyan leader Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi.

“The government had not sufficiently prepared the army to confront the rebellion,” Mr. Dramé said in an interview. “Most of the defeats in the desert were because the troops had no motivation to fight. The Malian army was humiliated.”


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