blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: This is the wurst (I couldn’t help it) sculpture I’ve ever seen. Titled “Kiss (Abstract Sculptures)”, it’s by the Austrian artist Erwin Wurm and is on view in his solo show at Lehmann Maupin gallery in New York. Wurm is most famous for his “One-minute Sculptures” – early crossovers between performance and sculpture in which he got live people to take on strange poses for brief moments on city streets. In these new so-called “Abstract” pieces, Wurm is asking lowly sausages to do similar work, then casting the results in bronze. Bronze always seems a perilously posh medium, but using it to immortalize animal intestines filled with ground pork just about keeps it humble.
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: This is the wurst (I couldn’t help it) sculpture I’ve ever seen. Titled “Kiss (Abstract Sculptures)”, it’s by the Austrian artist Erwin Wurm and is on view in his solo show at Lehmann Maupin gallery in New York. Wurm is most famous for his “One-minute Sculptures” – early crossovers between performance and sculpture in which he got live people to take on strange poses for brief moments on city streets. In these new so-called “Abstract” pieces, Wurm is asking lowly sausages to do similar work, then casting the results in bronze. Bronze always seems a perilously posh medium, but using it to immortalize animal intestines filled with ground pork just about keeps it humble.

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.


austinkleon:

Jorge Luis Borges: The Task of Art

The task of art is to transform what is continuously happening to us, to transform all these things into symbols, into music, into something which can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the sometimes joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. Your are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must be transformed, and eventually will be transformed. This revelation can appear anytime. A poet never rests. He’s always working, even when he dreams. Besides, the life of a writer, is a lonely one. You think you are alone, and as the years go by, if the stars are on your side, you may discover that you are at the center of a vast circle of invisible friends whom you will never get to know but who love you. And that is an immense reward.

Thx @robinsloan


"The less punctuation marks, taken in isolation, convey meaning or expression and the more they constitute the opposite pole in language to names, the more each of them acquires a definitive physiognomic status of its own, an expression of its own, which cannot be separated from its syntactic function but is by no means exhausted by it. When the hero of Gottfried Keller’s novel Der grune Heinrich was asked about the German capital letter P, he exclaimed, "That’s Pumpernickel!" That experience is certainly true of the figures of punctuation. An exclamation point looks like an index finger raised in warning; a question mark looks like a flashing light or the blink of an eye. A colon, says Karl Kraus, opens its mouth wide: woe to the writer who does not fill it with something nourishing. Visually, the semicolon looks like a drooping moustache; I am even more aware of its gamey taste. With self-satisfied peasant cunning, German quotation marks (« ») lick their lips…"


in-the-horniman:

These sixteen Easter eggs are from Czechoslovakia. Each one is hand blown and painted and then strung onto colourful ribbon so they could be hung up.
We currently have some Romanian Easter eggs on loan at Hall Place, Bexley and Whitstable Museum and Gallery and are definitely worth checking out. The loans are part of a project called Object in Focus, and more information can be found here: http://www.horniman.ac.uk/about/object-in-focus-loans